Tribal Leadership

New York Times #1 Bestseller Wall Street Journal, USA Today Bestseller
Most leaders agree that culture is the critical factor in performance, but can’t define it, measure it, or change it. As a result, the few organizations that get culture right seem magical, and people who try to replicate their success usually end up frustrated and cynical. This book shows two simple steps—diagnosis and then the best treatment that leaders take to build cultures that can do things most people think is impossible: out-innovating, outperforming, creating an immunity to scandals, and having mountains of fun in the process.
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Just finished Tribal Leadership, awesome book! Codifies what we instinctually try to do with Zappos culture.
Tony Hsieh, CEO, Zappos.com
Tribal Leadership presents a clear road map for the new reality of managing organizations, careers, and life. This book points to a new paradigm in not just information technology, but also business. It explains what to do in a world where every professional will have an electronic shingle on the Internet to create a vibrant, active network.
Reid Hoffman, Cofounder, Linkedin
EXCERPT FROM CHAPTER 1
Every organization is really a set of small towns. If you’re from a small town, think of the people there. If you’re not, think of, as Don Henley sings, “that same small town in each of us.” There are the business executive and the sheriff. There’s the town scandal—the preacher’s wife and the schoolteacher. There’s talk of who will be the next mayor, who will move away, and the price of grain (or oil or the Wal-Mart starting wage). There’s the high school, where the popular kid, the son of the town’s sheriff, throws a party the weekend his father is away. There are the church crowd, the bar friends, the single people, the book club, the bitter enemies.
There are also the ones who are the natural leaders, who explain why the party at the sheriff’s house seemed like a good idea at the time, and how sorry they are for the beer stains on the carpet. The people are different in every town, and the roles are never exactly the same. But there are more similarities than differences, and the metaphor itself always holds, from companies in Nebraska to ones in New York or Kuala Lumpur. We call these small towns tribes, and they form so naturally it’s as though our tribe is part of our genetic code. Tribes helped humans survive the last ice age, build farming communities, and, later, cities. Birds flock, fish school, people “tribe.”

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